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Pancreas Cancer

Open G tube to relieve nausea was posted 11/01/2005 09:21 pm by Susan in FMTX
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The purpose of the G tube is to drain the green bile. It is surgically implanted. If the stomach is unable to empty itself on it's own, then the G tube, when open, allows the bile to drain. When the G tube is clamped and the stomach is not working, the nausea becomes unbearable. The doctors want the G tube to remain clamped as long as possible to try to coax the stomach to contract and try to empty itself. My husband was supposed to start with it clamped for 20 minutes and work up to 2 hours and then more. It was impossible before the stomach paralysis ended.

The point is to get the stomach to start working. Do not introduce food by mouth until she can keep the G tube clamped for hours. In the meanwhile, like with my husband, the TPN can sustain.

The J tube goes directly into the jejunium (sp) and 'predigested' liquid food is dripped into it. This feeding method is preferable to TPN if a J tube was surgically implanted. However, if as in my husband's case, the J tube migrates up into the (paralyzed) stomach, then tube feedings must be discontinued because the stomach cannot empty itself.

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*DISCLAIMER: This page is an unmoderated forum, and the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Patients are advised to consult their personal physicians before making any medical decisions.
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