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Pancreas Cancer

CT/MRI was posted 04/30/2004 04:13 pm by Peter F
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Magnetic resonance imaging The role of MRI in pancreatic cancer has been less well studied than the role of CT scan. It does not appear to be superior to spiral CT scans. However, in patients with jaundice, the recently introduced MRCP can be used as a noninvasive method for imaging the biliary tree and pancreatic duct.

Whether MRCP is as sensitive and specific for pancreaticobiliary pathology as other procedures is currently under intense investigation. MRI is limited by the inability to perform MRI-directed needle aspirations; however, this technology is undergoing rapid change ----------- Computed tomography scan The most frequently used imaging technique is abdominal CT scan. Standard abdominal CT scan can help detect 70-80% of pancreatic carcinomas. Unfortunately, 40-50% of tumors smaller than 3 cm are missed, and these are the tumors most likely to still be resectable.

Due to its ubiquitous availability, abdominal CT scanning is usually the mainstay of initial diagnostic modalities used for assessing patients considered to have pancreatic carcinoma.

The more recent addition of spiral (ie, helical) CT scans with dual-phase contrast enhancement may significantly improve the sensitivity and specificity of abdominal CT scan findings in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Dual-phase spiral CT scan findings are approximately 80% accurate for helping determine the resectability potential of pancreatic carcinoma.

CT scans can be used to direct fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic masses ---------------- CT is cheaper than MRI. CT exposes you to X rays MRI does not. The contrast material is different for both.



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*DISCLAIMER: This page is an unmoderated forum, and the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Patients are advised to consult their personal physicians before making any medical decisions.
FULL DISCLAIMER


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