Pancreas Cancer Discussion Page:
An Unmoderated Forum
*
 
Support pancreas research*DISCLAIMER: This page is an unmoderated forum, and the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Patients are advised to consult their personal physicians before making any medical decisions.
FULL DISCLAIMER

Pancreas Cancer

We had the same questions was posted 04/30/2004 11:26 am by G Smith
E-mail Address: gasmith@rice.edu

Message Text
The whipple is a terribly invasive and traumatic surgery with a difficult and lengthy recovery and yes, there is a significant chance that the cancer will return after resection, but if it is really an option, go for it! It provides the only chance to try and beat this thing. Only about 1 in 5 patients are eligible, and even with all the diagnostic tests available, they still might not know until they start the surgery whether or not they will be able to complete it.

My mom (85 years old) was diagnosed in March, scheduled for the whipple in early April. After the laporoscopic staging exam was completed they started the whipple but had to stop becasue of smv involvement (sometimes chemo and/or radiation prior to surgery can make a difference when a blood vessel is involved, sometimes not). Although she was frightened by the thought of the surgery, she was disappointed when they were unable to do it. Age is just one of many factors, but a competent medical team will take that into account to help determine a patients eligibility. The most important things to us was having a surgeon/team/institution in whom we had confidence; a surgeon/instiution that performs the surgery frequently and really knows what they are doing and has an awareness of all the available options.

If it is determined at some point that your relative isn't eligible for the whipple (as in our case), then that produces a different set of circumstances (and emotions) for which one must learn to live. Unfortunately it is the nature of this type of cancer that most of the options from which we have to choose are the 'best of the worst' scenarios.

Learn as much as you can about this type of cancer and understand that everyone has a different anatomy/pathology and what works for some may not work for others. I also find it helpful to follow this board regularly just because it helps to know there are others going through the same thing and to learn about everyone's story. Good luck.

Reply to this message | Return to Main Message List


Responses

No replies on file.


*DISCLAIMER: This page is an unmoderated forum, and the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Patients are advised to consult their personal physicians before making any medical decisions.
FULL DISCLAIMER


Pancreas Home | Surgical | Medical | Basic Sci | Docs | Registry | FAQ | Appts | Chat

Feedback | Pathology Home | Oncology Center Home | Search
Copyright © 2019 The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
Last Modified: 11/11/2002 10:50 am