Pancreas Cancer Discussion Page:
An Unmoderated Forum
*
 
Support pancreas research*DISCLAIMER: This page is an unmoderated forum, and the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Patients are advised to consult their personal physicians before making any medical decisions.
FULL DISCLAIMER

Pancreas Cancer

Malabsorbtion was posted 03/30/2010 06:02 pm by Anonymous
E-mail Address:

Message Text
Here is some information that might be helpful. If you have concerns or suspect malabsorbtion then you need to see a GI specialist.

Diagnosis There is no specific test for Malabsorption. As for most medical conditions, investigation is guided by symptoms and signs. Moreover, tests for pancreatic function are complex and varies widely between centres.

Blood Tests

Routine blood tests may reveal anaemia, high ESR or low albumin; which has high sensitivity for presence of organic disease [7][8]. In this setting, microcytic anaemia usually implies iron deficiency and macrocytosis can be from impaired folic acid or B12 absorption or both. Low cholesterol or triglyceride may give clue toward fat malabsorption as low calcium and phosphate toward osteomalacia from low vitamin D.

Specific vitamins like vitamin D or micro nutrient like zinc levels can be checked. Fat soluble vitamins (A, D, E & K) are affected in fat malabsorption. Prolonged prothrombin time can be from vitamin K deficiency.

Serological studies Specific tests are carried out to determine underlying cause. IgA tissue trans glutamate or IgA antiendomysium assay for gluten sensitive enteropathy. Stool studies

Microscopy is particularly useful in diarrhoea, may show protozoa like giardia, ova, cyst and other infective agents. Fecal fat study to diagnose steatorrhoea is less frequently performed nowadays. Low elastase is indicative of pancreatic insufficiency. Chymotrypsin and pancreolauryl can be assessed as well[9] Radiological studies

Barium follow through is useful in delineating small intestinalanatomy. Barium enema may be undertaken to see colonic or ileal lesions.

CT abdomen is useful in ruling out structural abnormality, done in pancreatic protocol when visualising pancreas. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) to complement or as an alternative to ERCP.

You might want to google WebMD or other sources for more details. This can happen for many reasons including but not limited to pancreatic cancer.

Reply to this message | Return to Main Message List


Responses

*DISCLAIMER: This page is an unmoderated forum, and the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Patients are advised to consult their personal physicians before making any medical decisions.
FULL DISCLAIMER


Pancreas Home | Surgical | Medical | Basic Sci | Docs | Registry | FAQ | Appts | Chat

Feedback | Pathology Home | Oncology Center Home | Search
Copyright © 2019 The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
Last Modified: 11/11/2002 10:50 am