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Pancreas Cancer

Agree - CGA (article) was posted 07/31/2009 06:14 pm by Sandra (TX)
E-mail Address: smpettit@swbell.net

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Agree.

Chromogranin A is considered the best general serum indicator for neuroendocrine tumors, especially non-functional ones that don't produce any symptoms. Functional neuroendocrines produce an excessive hormone depending on the kind of tumor, and thus, these elevated levels of any one of these hormones can be an indicator for functional tumors. There are other markers, but CGA is the most general one.

In my case, the CGA was barely elevated at diagnosis and has NOT been useful in monitoring for recurrence. I had no other serum markers.

The octreotide scan has been the most sensitive technology for detecting nueroendocrine tumor in me.

Here's an article on the topic:

'Tumor Markers in Neuroendocrine Tumors' by: Barbro Erikssona, Kjell Öberga, Mats Stridsbergb

'Most neuroendocrine tumors produce and secrete a multitude of peptide hormones and amines. Some of these substances cause a specific clinical syndrome: carcinoid, Zollinger-Ellison, hyperglycemic, glucagonoma and WDHA syndrome. Specific markers for these syndromes are basal and/or stimulated levels of urinary 5-HIAA, serum or plasma gastrin, insulin, glucagon and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, respectively.

Some carcinoid tumors and about one third of endocrine pancreatic tumors do not present any clinical symptoms and are called 'nonfunctioning' tumors. Therefore, general tumor markers such as chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide, serum neuron-specific enolase and subunits of glycoprotein hormones have been used for screening purposes in patients without distinct clinical hormone-related symptoms.

Among these general tumor markers chromogranin A, although its precise function is not yet established, has been shown to be a very sensitive and specific serum marker for various types of neuroendocrine tumors. This is because it may also be elevated in many cases of less well-differentiated tumors of neuroendocrine origin that do not secrete known hormones.

At the moment, chromogranin A is considered the best general neuroendocrine serum or plasma marker available both for diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation and is increased in 50-100% of patients with various neuroendocrine tumors.

Chromogranin A serum or plasma levels reflect tumor load, and it may be an independent marker of prognosis in patients with midgut carcinoids.'

Copyright © 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel



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